Study of CSF flow physics and its parameters at the level of aqueduct in normal individuals

  • Dr Sankalp Dilip Shirsath Assistant Professor, Rural Medical College, Pravara Institute of Medical Sciences (Deemed to be University)
  • Dr Raunaklaxmi A. Shirsath- Talele Assistant Professor, Rural Medical College, Pravara Institute of Medical Sciences (Deemed to be University)
  • Dr Apurva S. Kale-Shirsath Assistant Professor, Rural Medical College, Pravara Institute of Medical Sciences (Deemed to be University)
  • Dr Pooja Shah Resident Rural Medical College, Pravara Institute of Medical Sciences (Deemed to be University)
Keywords: Cerebrospinal fluid flow, Phase contrast MRI scanning, CSF volume

Abstract

Phase-contrast MRI (PC-MRI) is a rapid, simple, and non- invasive technique, and is sensitive to CSF flow.  It has been available for some time and been used in the past decade in the evaluation of cranial and spinal CSF flow, demonstrating a mechanical ‘coupling between cerebral blood and CSF flows throughout the cardiac cycle and the temporal coordinated succession of these flows’ in normal people. The technique led to a better understanding of the pathophysiological basis of diseases with dysfunction of CSF flow.

The aim of the study is to study the physics of the CSF flow and to establish the normal parameters of the CSF flow at the level of the aqueduct. MRI brain with CSF flow study was done in 40 patients. These patients were in the age group of 20-60 years and came with no significant clinical complaints.

Phase-contrast MRI scanning was used following the CSF Quantitative flow protocol and CSF_ DRIVE protocol was followed. Forward flow volume, Backward flow volume, regurgitate fraction, absolute stroke volume, Stroke volume was calculated at the level of cerebral aqueduct provides the best understanding of CSF flow physics and normal CSF parameters.

The stroke volume of 55 % of individuals was seen in the range of 2.0 to 3.0 and 45% of individuals was seen in the range of 1.0 to 2.0 and Absolute stroke volume of maximum individuals i.e. 72.5% was seen in the range of the 3.6 to 4.5 ml/min.

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CITATION
DOI: 10.26838/MEDRECH.2021.8.6.575
Published: 2021-12-15
How to Cite
1.
Shirsath SD, Shirsath- Talele RA, Kale-Shirsath AS, Shah P. Study of CSF flow physics and its parameters at the level of aqueduct in normal individuals. Med. res. chronicles [Internet]. 2021Dec.15 [cited 2023Feb.9];8(6):548-57. Available from: https://medrech.com/index.php/medrech/article/view/561
Section
Original Research Article