ASSESSMENT OF BACTERIAL CONTAMINATION IN CELLULAR PHONES OF DENTAL PROFESSIONALS WORKING IN A DENTAL INSTITUTION IN BELGAUM CITY – A CROSS SECTIONAL STUDY

  • Dr. Akanksha Tiwari Dept. of Public Health Dentistry, KLE VK Institute of Dental Sciences, Belgaum, Karnataka, India
  • Dr. Anil V Ankola Dept. of Public Health Dentistry, KLE VK Institute of Dental Sciences, Belgaum, Karnataka, India
  • Dr. Harshita Mishra Manipal college of dental sciences, mangalore, Karnataka, India
  • Dr. Mayank Kakkar Dept. of Public Health Dentistry, KLE VK Institute of Dental Sciences, Belgaum, Karnataka, India
Keywords: mobile phones, dental care providers, bacterial contamination, 70% isopropyl alcohol

Abstract

Introduction: Today mobile phones have become one of the necessities in social as well as in professional life of dental care providers. Their cellular phones are often touched during or after the examination of patients without hand washing. So they can harbor various potential pathogens causing the risk of their transmission to patients and dental health care workers in the dental care environment. Hence the present study was done to assess the cellular phones of
postgraduate students for microbial contamination.

Objectives: To assess the bacterial contamination of cellular phones used by postgraduate students and to determine the effectiveness of 70% isopropyl alcohol for decontamination.

Methodology: The present study was a descriptive, cross-sectional study. The study group comprised of postgraduate students of KLE VKIDS.A self-administered questionnaire was completed by the consenting participants that consisted of 19 closed ended and 3 open ended questions. Two swabs were taken before and after wiping the cellular phones with 70% isopropyl alcohol. The swabs were then streaked onto blood and MacConkey agar and allowed to incubate for 48 hrs.

Result: Out of 59 participants, 51.2% males and 48.8% females. 76.2% of the participants used cellular phones during clinical hours while 31% even used them between the patients without hand washing/ gloved hands. Significant difference were found between number of colonies before and after cleaning with 70% isopropyl alcohol (p value<0.05)

Conclusion: Cellular phones may act as carrier for cross contamination among patients and dental personnel. Simple cleaning with isopropyl alcohol reduced the microbial load of the cellular phones. Hence it is recommended that dental colleges should develop strict guidelines concerning cell phone use and hygiene.

Downloads

Download data is not yet available.

References

1. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arthur_C._Clarke accessed on 25th April 2014.
2. Singh S, Acharya S, Bhat M, Rao S, Chakravarthy K (2010) Mobile Phone Hygiene: Potential Risks Posed by Use in the Clinics of an Indian Dental School. J Dent Educ 74,1153 - 1158
3. Dixit S, ShuklaS, Bhagwat AK, Bindal A, Goyal A, Zaidi AK , Shrivastava A (2010)A Study to Evaluate Mobile Phone Dependence Among Students of a Medical College and Associated Hospital of Central India. Indian J Community Med 35, 339-341.
4. Jayalakshmi J, Appalaraju B, Usha S(2008) Cellphones asReservoirs of Nosocomial Pathogens. J Assoc Physicians India 56, 388-389
5. Badr R, Badr H, Ali N(2012)Mobile phones and nosocomial infections. Int J Infect Control, 1-5
6. Karabay O, Koçoglu E, Tahtaci M (2007) The role of mobile phones in the spread of bacteria associated with nosocomial infections. JInfect Developing Countries1, 72-73.
7. Bhat SS, Hegde SK, Salian S (2011) Potential of Mobile Phones to Serve as a Reservoir in Spread of Nosocomial Pathogens. Online J Health Allied Scs10, 1-3
8. Goel M, Goel A (2009) Mobile phones of dental professionals a potential source of bacterial contamination — A Bacteriological Study. Indian J Dent Scs1, 42-47
9. Brady RRW, Wasson A, Stirling I, McAllister C, Damani NN (2006) Is your phone bugged? The incidence of bacteria known to cause nosocomial infection on healthcare workers’ mobile phones. J Hosp Infect 62, 123-125.
10. Ulger F, Esen S, Dilek A, Yanik K, Gunaydin M, Leblebicioglu H (2009)Are we aware how contaminated our mobile phones with nosocomial pathogens?Ann Clin Microbiol Antimicrob8, 7.
11. Goldblatt JG, Krief I, Klonsky T, Haller D, Milloul V, Sixsmith DM, Srugo I, Potasman I(2007) Use of cellular telephones and transmission of pathogens by medical staff in New York and Israel. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 28, 500–503.
12. http://www.motorolasolutions.com. How to disinfect and clean motorola mobile computers: MC55, MC55A0, MC65, MC70, MC75 AND MC75A. Accessed on 26th April 2014.
13. CDC Protocol for Hand Hygiene and Glove Use Observations (2009) 14. Kanjirath PP, Coplen AE, Chapman JC, Peters MC, Inglehart MR (2009) Effectiveness of gloves and infection control in dentistry: student and provider perspectives. J Dent Educ73, 571–580.
15. Tambekar DH, Gulhane PB, Dahikar SG, Dudhane MN (2008) Nosocomial hazards of doctor‘s mobile phones in hospitals. J Med Sci8, 73-76.
16. Ramesh J, Carter AO, Campbell MH, Gibbons N, Powlett C, Moseley H Sr, Lewis D, Carter T (2008)Use of mobile phones by medical staff at Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Barbados: evidence for both benefit and harm. J Hosp Infection70, 160-165.
17. Elkholy MT, Ewees IE (2010) Mobile (cellular) phone contamination with nosocomial pathogens in Intensive care units. Med JCairo Univ2,1-5.
18. Srikanth P, Ezhil R, Suchitra S, Anandhi I, Maheswari U, Kalyani J (2009) The mobile phone in a tropical setting emerging threat for infection control. J Med 2. 18-20
19. Bhattacharya K (2005) Mobile phone and the surgeon–Is there acontroversy? Ind J Surgery 67, 53-54.
How to Cite
1.
Dr. Akanksha Tiwari, Dr. Anil V Ankola, Dr. Harshita Mishra, Dr. Mayank Kakkar. ASSESSMENT OF BACTERIAL CONTAMINATION IN CELLULAR PHONES OF DENTAL PROFESSIONALS WORKING IN A DENTAL INSTITUTION IN BELGAUM CITY – A CROSS SECTIONAL STUDY. Med. res. chronicles [Internet]. 2016Jun.30 [cited 2021Oct.21];3(03):266-73. Available from: https://medrech.com/index.php/medrech/article/view/175
Section
Original Research Article